#BrooklynGirlCode’s #TBT #TimeMachine: “Candy Girl” New Edition (1982)

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New Edition Official Candy Girl cover art. Photo courtesy of Undergroundhiphop.com.

“My girl’s like candy, a candy treat
She knocks me high up off my feet
She’s so fine as can be
I know this girl is meant for me!”

The year was 1982. Ronald Reagan was President of the United States. The average monthly rent was $335.00. The cost of a gallon of milk was $1.35 and you could own your very own Ford Mustang for just $6,572.00! But, the biggest news was happening right in Boston. Four young teenage boys ranging from the ages of 13-15 years old that called themselves “New Edition” were blowing up the R&B charts with their hot new single “Candy Girl.”

The song, officially released on November 14th, 1982 proved to be an instant classic. The official video for “Candy Girl” released in April of 1983 showcased New Edition singing the young, fun lyrics inspired by Jackson Five‘s 1970 song “ABC.” There was no doubt about it. “Candy Girl” had all the girls checking for Ronnie (Devoe), Bobby (Brown), Ricky (Bell), Mike (Bivins) and Ralph (Tresvant)!

“Candy Girl” would eventually peak to #1 on the R&B and UK Singles Charts. The song was the first hit single released off New Edition’s debut album Candy Girl (1983 Streetwise Records) but it most certainly would not be the last from these talented young men!

Check out the official video for “Candy Girl” below and take a ride with #BrooklynGirlCode in our first ever #TBT #TimeMachine! Thank us later! -xoxo #BrooklynGirlCode ❤

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Cover art for The Last Poets' Self-titled 1970 debut album

Remembering #TheLastPoets for #NationalPoetryMonth

April marks National Poetry Month across the globe. So, it’s only right for #BrooklynGirlCode to take a little time out to remember one of the seminal groups responsible for the evolution of modern day poetry and what would later become Hip-Hop music. The Last Poets formed in Harlem, New York in 1969. But, little did they know that after forming, they would have a mega influence on many generations of music to follow and many of today’s biggest Hip-Hop stars including Common, Kanye West, Mos Def and others.

Salute to The Last Poets for all their contributions to music and American culture as a whole! Below is a recent Instagram post from The National Museum of African-American History and Culture paying homage to the legendary Last Poets.  ❤

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Long before records were spun at park jams and parties across New York City, spoken-word artists paired the natural rhythm of their works with music. From the Harlem Renaissance through the 1960s, artists relied on the spoken-word for powerful political and social commentary. Initially formed in 1968, over the years members of The Last Poets have included Gylan Kain, David Nelson, Abiodun Oyowele, Felipe Luciano, Jalal Mansur Nuriddin, Umar Bin Hassan, Sulaiman El-Hadi, and Nijala Obabi. The Last Poets is the debut spoken word album by The Last Poets, released in 1970. The Last Poets are considered one of the godfathers of Hip-Hop. Their politically charged Black nationalist poems, infused with drums and jazz, continue to inspire generations of poets and lyricists. This collective of The Last Poets was founded by Jalal Mansur Nuriddin, Umar Bin Hassan, Abiodun Oyewole, and percussionist Nilaja. #NationalPoetryMonth 📸: Gift of Umar Bin Hassan, © 1970 Douglas Records, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

A post shared by NMAAHC (@nmaahc) on

It Was a Special Edition of #TBT at Brooklyn Bowl This Past Week and #BrooklynGirlCode was in the Building!

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It was a special throw back night this past Thursday in Brooklyn at popular live music venue Brooklyn Bowl and you know #BrooklynGirlCode was in the building! Mannie Fresh, one half of the legendary Louisiana Hip-Hop duo “Big Tymer$” was on the 1’s and 2’s for Brooklyn Bowl’s special edition of “Bowl Train” and he kept the crowd moving all night! Fresh had nothing but the classics blasting from the speakers covering every decade from the 70’s, 80’s 90’s and 2000’s.

It was a “Lovely Day” in Brooklyn to get your two-step on and see a Hip-Hop legend go to work. Check out some cool footage and flicks from “Bowl Train” and a fun throwback video by the Big Tymers below and enjoy your weekend! -xoxo #BrooklynGirlCode ❤

#AintItABlessing?! #TeeGrizzley Performs Live @ SOB’s for Hot 97’s ‘Who’s Next?’ Series

“Don’t let them get the best of you, just get the revenue n*gga.” – Tee Grizzley, “First Day Out”

It was all love last night at popular N.Y.C. venue SOB’s for Hot 97’s ‘Who’s Next?’ series and #BrooklynGirlCode was in the building! The series which features new up-and-coming rappers and singers was headlined this month by Midwest rapper Tee Grizzley. Grizzley who hails out of Detroit, Michigan and is currently signed to 300 Entertainment showed the N.Y.C. crowd just exactly what he was made of last night during his live performance. The rapper who is garnering a lot of attention right now for his smash hit “First Day Out” off his debut mixtape My Moment decided to bring along some of his industry friends while live on stage last night including fellow rappers Shy Glizzy who hails out of Washington D.C. and Dae Dae who is from Atlanta and is popular for his hit song “Spend It.” New up-and-coming Bronx rappers Snoopy Dinero and Maliibu Miitch also performed for the packed house. All in all everyone on last night’s bill definitely represented for their respective home team! Check out exclusive footage and photos from last night’s event below and stay tuned for more live events coming soon via #BrooklynGirlCode!

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Shy Glizzy getting his boogie on last night at Hot 97’s ‘Who’s Next?’ series.
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Atlanta rapper Dae Dae showing off for the SOB’s crowd.

 

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Maliibu Miitch Top 5??

 

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Maliibu Miitch reppin’ for the ladies last night!!

 

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Bronx rapper Snoopy Dinero getting his shine on.
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Tee Grizzley is in the building!
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Grizzley exiting the stage after a well done performance.

 

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#BrooklynGirlCode Creator/Editor Aziza Hassan showing some love last night at SOB’s. ❤

 

#InMemoriam The Notorious B.I.G. Twenty Years Later

Mural in Brooklyn, New York depicting The Notorious B.I.G. as Che Guevara

Check it/ I grew up a fuckin’ screw-up/ Got introduced to the game/ Got an ounce/ and fuckin’ blew up – The Notorious B.I.G., “Runnin'”

What a difference twenty years can make. Or, in this case, what a difference twenty years can not make! It’s been two decades since The Notorious B.I.G. was tragically gunned down in Los Angeles on March 9th, 1997. However, the hip-hop template that B.I.G. set prior to his passing has yet to be altered. Christopher Wallace was 24-years-old when he passed. Looking back to that year, it seems like he was way older than he was because of his mature demeanor. B.I.G. was definitely one of the coolest and just a real lyricist at heart. He put words together like no other lyricist in hip-hop had done before him. Although we’ve seen a few eras of hip-hop come and go since 1997, there is still this obvious void that has yet to be filled. Why is this?

Shortly after B.I.G.’s passing, Jay-Z (Shawn Carter) rose to stardom and did an excellent job of continuing the legacy his predecessor began. But, as far as talent and skills on the mic, no one has yet to surpass the young Brooklyn boy with the crisp Coogi sweater and the fancy Versace shades.

It’s 2017 and Emo Rap is what sells records. Long gone are the days of “rags to riches,” “made it from the bottom” hip-hop fairytales. Still, we all get a thrill out of dreaming about B.I.G.’s imaginary replacement and hoping that they could possibly be waiting on the sideline somewhere for their chance at fame. Until then… B.I.G. reigns supreme! Rest in peace Comandante Biggie!

The Notorious B.I.G. in his element! Photo courtesy of Aziza Hassan’s instagram @rashidaaz via @trace_urban Instagram

 

#TBT: The #AllTheWayUp Edition!

I wanted to dedicate this post to female Hip-Hop artist Remy Ma. She appeared today on daytime talk show “The Real” and looked oh so fabulous while on the show. It was a great interview and she spoke about all the things going on in her life right now following her highly publicized release from prison back in 2014.

“I had a lot of people telling me that I wouldn’t be able to do it, that it was over for me; and when you’re in such a dark place like that, it’s easy to believe all the negative. So, I’m just grateful and really blessed.” – Remy Ma on “The Real” talk show on October 20th, 2016

In April of 2015, I had the opportunity to meet her and her mentor/brother Hip-Hop veteran Fat Joe during an interview for a podcast I was working for at the time called “The Cipher” and Remy Ma was a total sweetheart! I’m very proud of the progression that Remy Ma is making as a Hip-Hop artist and as a role model for young African-American women. I hope she continues to take the high road. She isn’t letting any of her haters or past demons hold her back and this is admirable. Congrats to Remy Ma on all her success and continue to go “All The Way Up!” 😉

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Photo courtesy of Aziza Hassan’s Instagram @rashidaaz

 

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Photo courtesy of “The Real” Instagram @therealdaytime

 

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Remy Ma, #BrooklynGirlCode creator Aziza Hassan and Hip-Hop veteran Fat Joe

#RIPTupacShakur

Photo Courtesy of @Celebritea_News Instagram
Photo Courtesy of @celebri_teanews Instagram

“We used to be like distant cousins/ fightin’/ playin’ dozens/ whole neighborhood buzzin’/ knowing that we wasn’t.” – Tupac Shakur, “I Ain’t Mad At Cha.”

It’s difficult to believe that today marks the twentieth anniversary of the death of Tupac Amaru Shakur who was known to the world as just “Tupac.” Although the prolific Hip-Hop artist and poet has been gone two decades now, his music and life continue to remain extremely relevant in the media. With an upcoming biopic being released later this year about his tumultuous life and more new music being released, Tupac continues to make history in his demise. Rest in Paradise to a true hip-hop legend and Rest in Paradise to a true hip-hop legend’s mama (Afeni Shakur 9/10/47-5/2/16) as well! “Tupac Rifa Siempre!” ❤

Photo Courtesy of Aziza Hassan’s Twitter: @datfencingchic

Tupac releasing new music Hip Hop My Way
A news spot that I wrote for Hip Hop My Way in 2015 that did high numbers on the Social Network.
Tupac Shakur Covers The Source Magazine March 1994
Tupac Shakur covers The Source magazine, March 1994
"Tupac Rifa Siempre" mural art
“Tupac Rifa Siempre”
Tupac with his mother, the late Afeni Shakur
Tupac with his mother, the late Afeni Shakur