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Is #Future the #Best #Rapper Alive?!!

Rapper Future covers GQ magazine’s May 2022 issue.

Is Future the best rapper alive? GQ magazine surely thinks so! The Hip-Hop star covers the May 2022 issue of the popular men’s magazine and he came dressed to impress!

Future for GQ magazine styled by GQ’s Fashion Director-at-Large Mobolaji Dawodu.

Ever since Future first stepped on the scene back in the early 2010’s releasing his series of classic mixtapes 1000, Dirty Sprite, True Story, the Atlanta native has been pumping out hit after hit for our listening pleasure. With the unique talent to switch up his flow on every single track according to the beat, Future definitely makes #BrooklynGirlCode’s list of top rappers in the game. So, please don’t count Future Hendrix out when discussing your top five — dead or alive!

Check out the full cover story here via GQ.com and scroll down for more cool pics of Future from his GQ spread! -xoxo #BrooklynGirlCode <3

Future for GQ magazine styled by GQ’s Fashion Director-at-Large Mobolaji Dawodu.
Future for GQ magazine styled by GQ’s Fashion Director-at-Large Mobolaji Dawodu.

Related: Organized Noize Speak On Putting Southern Hip-Hop on The Map, Bringing Creativity Back to The Game & Their New Critically Acclaimed Self-Titled EP

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#RestWell #Coach #JohnThompson! -xoxo #BrooklynGirlCode

Legendary Basketball Hall of Fame Coach John Thompson passed away surrounded by family at his Arlington, Virginia home on August 30th, 2020. In 1984, with the assistance of NBA legend Patrick Ewing, Coach Thompson became the first Black coach to lead an NCAA Division I basketball team to the national championship beating the Houston Cougars in the finals. During his tenure with the Georgetown Hoyas (1972-1999), Thompson lead his team to a 596-239 (.714) winning record. Thompson who was a Washington D.C. native was also a two-time NBA champion playing for the Boston Celtics alongside Bill Russell from 1964-1966. In 1988 at the Seoul Olympics, Thompson served as the head coach for the Unites States Men’s basketball team. Under Thompson’s instruction, retired NBA player and 2016 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee Allen Iverson would go on to set the Georgetown University record for highest career scoring average (22.9 points per game). In 2017, Patrick Ewing took over as head coach for the Hoyas. However, it’s obvious that no one will ever make the same mark in Georgetown that Coach John Thompson made. Rest well to a true sports legend!
Coach John Thompson with Coach John Chaney
2 Johns. 2 Legends. Coach Thompson x Coach Chaney. Rest well to Coach John Thompson! Image courtesy of Temple Men’s Basketball Instagram.
Coach John Thompson at work in 1996. Photo courtesy of the New York Times
Coach John Thompson at work in 1996. Image courtesy of the New York Times
Coach John Thompson with NBA legend Patrick Ewing.  In 1984, Ewing helped lead the Georgetown Hoyas to their first national championship. Photo courtesy of Georgetown University Instagram.
Coach John Thompson with NBA legend Patrick Ewing at Georgetown University. In 1984, Ewing helped lead the Georgetown Hoyas to their first national championship. Image courtesy of Georgetown University Instagram.
Coach John Thompson and NBA Hall of Famer Allen Iverson sharing a laugh.
Coach John Thompson and NBA Hall of Famer Allen Iverson sharing a laugh. Image courtesy of Allen Iverson’s Instagram.
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#JackieRobinson on Breaking the #ColorBarrier in Major League Sports

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Photo courtesy of ESPN Instagram (@espn).

“Feels so good to be a Crooklyn Dodger!” – Masta Ace “Crooklyn Dodgers

The day was April 15th, 1947. Seventy years ago today, to be exact. It was Opening Day for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the historic Ebbets Field stadium which was conveniently located in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York. However, this Opening Day was way different than the Dodgers’ previous ones. Today, a young man by the name of Jackie Robinson who wore the number “42” on his jersey would be taking the field as the starting first baseman, batting second. On this day, seventy years ago, Jackie Robinson single-handedly broke the color barrier in Major League Sports.

Although there were rumors that people would be boycotting the game due to their disapproval of Robinson’s integration, the game actually went very well. The Dodgers would go on to win 5-3 against the Boston Braves (now known as the Atlanta Braves). When Robinson’s number was called on the P.A. system as the Brooklyn Dodgers’ starting first baseman, the crowd applauded “politely” according to sports editor Ed Silverman who was at Ebbets Field on this historic day in 1947 to witness history. In a new article for The New Yorker which commemorates the 70th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier in Major League Baseball, Ed Silverman revisits April 15th, 1947 and talks about what the day was like:

“I deliberately sat in the bleachers, which were predominantly filled with black attendees. The women were all well coifed. Many wore lovely dresses and light coats. The men were all nicely attired. It was more like going to church than to a ballgame.”

Jackie Robinson would go on to have a stellar first season in his Major League Baseball career and became the recipient of the inaugural MLB Rookie of the Year Award in 1947. Robinson also served as a Major League Baseball All-Star for six consecutive seasons from 1949 through 1954 and won the National League Most Valuable Player Award in 1949, becoming the first Black player to do so. All in a day’s work for a legendary sports giant like Mr. Robinson. All in a day’s work!

Check out some cool footage via MLB.com of Jackie Robinson’s opening day, here.