#BrooklynGirlCode’s #TBT #TimeMachine: “Candy Girl” New Edition (1982)

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New Edition Official Candy Girl cover art. Photo courtesy of Undergroundhiphop.com.

“My girl’s like candy, a candy treat
She knocks me high up off my feet
She’s so fine as can be
I know this girl is meant for me!”

The year was 1982. Ronald Reagan was President of the United States. The average monthly rent was $335.00. The cost of a gallon of milk was $1.35 and you could own your very own Ford Mustang for just $6,572.00! But, the biggest news was happening right in Boston. Four young teenage boys ranging from the ages of 13-15 years old that called themselves “New Edition” were blowing up the R&B charts with their hot new single “Candy Girl.”

The song, officially released on November 14th, 1982 proved to be an instant classic. The official video for “Candy Girl” released in April of 1983 showcased New Edition singing the young, fun lyrics inspired by Jackson Five‘s 1970 song “ABC.” There was no doubt about it. “Candy Girl” had all the girls checking for Ronnie (Devoe), Bobby (Brown), Ricky (Bell), Mike (Bivins) and Ralph (Tresvant)!

“Candy Girl” would eventually peak to #1 on the R&B and UK Singles Charts. The song was the first hit single released off New Edition’s debut album Candy Girl (1983 Streetwise Records) but it most certainly would not be the last from these talented young men!

Check out the official video for “Candy Girl” below and take a ride with #BrooklynGirlCode in our first ever #TBT #TimeMachine! Thank us later! -xoxo #BrooklynGirlCode ❤

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Cover art for The Last Poets' Self-titled 1970 debut album

Remembering #TheLastPoets for #NationalPoetryMonth

April marks National Poetry Month across the globe. So, it’s only right for #BrooklynGirlCode to take a little time out to remember one of the seminal groups responsible for the evolution of modern day poetry and what would later become Hip-Hop music. The Last Poets formed in Harlem, New York in 1969. But, little did they know that after forming, they would have a mega influence on many generations of music to follow and many of today’s biggest Hip-Hop stars including Common, Kanye West, Mos Def and others.

Salute to The Last Poets for all their contributions to music and American culture as a whole! Below is a recent Instagram post from The National Museum of African-American History and Culture paying homage to the legendary Last Poets.  ❤

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Long before records were spun at park jams and parties across New York City, spoken-word artists paired the natural rhythm of their works with music. From the Harlem Renaissance through the 1960s, artists relied on the spoken-word for powerful political and social commentary. Initially formed in 1968, over the years members of The Last Poets have included Gylan Kain, David Nelson, Abiodun Oyowele, Felipe Luciano, Jalal Mansur Nuriddin, Umar Bin Hassan, Sulaiman El-Hadi, and Nijala Obabi. The Last Poets is the debut spoken word album by The Last Poets, released in 1970. The Last Poets are considered one of the godfathers of Hip-Hop. Their politically charged Black nationalist poems, infused with drums and jazz, continue to inspire generations of poets and lyricists. This collective of The Last Poets was founded by Jalal Mansur Nuriddin, Umar Bin Hassan, Abiodun Oyewole, and percussionist Nilaja. #NationalPoetryMonth 📸: Gift of Umar Bin Hassan, © 1970 Douglas Records, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

A post shared by NMAAHC (@nmaahc) on